What are the parts of a church building?

What are the parts of a church building called?

The nave is the main part of the church where the congregation (the people who come to worship) sit. The aisles are the sides of the church which may run along the side of the nave. The transept, if there is one, is an area which crosses the nave near the top of the church. … People in the church sit facing the altar.

What are the features of a church building?

Features of churches

  • the altar – a table where the bread and wine are blessed during the Eucharist.
  • the lectern – a stand where the Bible is read from.
  • the pulpit – where the priest delivers sermons.
  • a crucifix – a cross with Jesus on.

What is the layout of a church?

The entryway to the church is the narthex; the church portals are located here. The nave, or center aisle is an elongated rectangle and pews are located to each side. During processions, ceremonies or masses, people walk up the nave to the altar. The crossing is where the transepts and nave intersect.

What are the four parts of the church?

The words one, holy, catholic and apostolic are often called the four marks of the Church.

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What are the three parts of the church?

Churches Militant, Penitent, and Triumphant – Wikipedia.

How would you describe a church architecture?

Though church architecture has taken on many forms and levels of complexity over time, core elements are all still present today. Some of these architectural components include the steeple, portals, apse, and buttresses. Also included are components of style such as crosses and stained glass.

Are churches built in cross shapes?

Shape: they are most often built in a cruciform shape (cross shaped) Probably a fairly obvious reasoning behind this feature – the cross of course represents the cross in Christian teachings on which Jesus died for our sins.

What surrounds a church?

In Christian countries a churchyard is a patch of land adjoining or surrounding a church, which is usually owned by the relevant church or local parish itself. In the Scots language and in both Scottish English and Ulster-Scots, this can also be known as a kirkyard.